Education

Education

Lokdon uses a granular approach to data encryption. The use of DNA and DDNA guarantees confidentiality, integrity and availability. Cybercrime is rising, and educational institutions are high-profile targets. It is imperative that we take a detour by thinking outside the box to solve the imminent threat on cybersecuirty. Unfortunately, many educational organizations are not using any encryption technology even though encryption is a mainstay security control that is required by regulations and policies. This practice must change if schools are to protect sensi-tive data and avoid penalties.Adhering to data security requirements is a process, not a single step. There are many rules to follow, and a “one size fits all” ap-proach does not work. With tight budgets and limited resources, it’s no wonder that schools are struggling to meet compliance requirements for a plethora of regulatory mandates. Protecting sensitive data is more crucial now than ever.

In addition to protecting data via encryption, it’s important to authenticate both data and communications (i.e., transmitted files and messages) to ensure that the data received matches the data sent. Verifying data ar-rived from true and trusted sources is another key aspect of maintaining security, which is why security professionals recommend cryptographic hashing. A hash is a number produced from a string of text that acts like a digital fingerprint. When someone sends a message, for example, they can generate a hash and include it with the message. The recipient of the message can then create a hash of the received message and compare it with the original hash. If the two match, the message’s authenticity is confirmed. Spoofing a hash is virtually impossible, so this tactic offers one way to ensure files and messages weren’t tampered with.Encryption can — and should — happen in a variety of ways in a variety of situations. Windows BitLocker drive encryption is an example of one essentially free solution in the consumer space. Other times, certain hardware may be handy for encrypting data without the need for sep-arate software. Such “self-encrypting” hardware options exist for large hard drives as well as portable flash drives. Web traffic can be encrypted using SSL (Secure Socket Layer), and the list goes on. Simply put, if desired, diligent users can keep their data encrypted wherever it goes.

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